Tag Archives | Range Of Motion

How to Progress to a Front Lever

Ryan from Gold Medal Bodies goes deep into front level progressions and shows one of the ways to work your way up to a front level. Below are the recommended steps, but make sure to watch the entire video to fully understand them.

1. The mini pull – To strengthen up your scapula
2. Straight arm chest pullups – To increase ROM
3. Mini pulls with knee pulls – Improve core strength
4. The front tuck
5. The front tuck to the open front tuck
6. Tuck for reps
7. Tuck with leg extensions

Learn How to Back Flip in 31 Days
Learn How to Back Flip in 31 Days on Amazon

Your gym doesn’t have gymnastic rings? Get them here.

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Artistic Balancing on Hand Balancing Canes

A hand balancer from Russia, Nikita Sukhanov, recently released a new video full of powerful balancing moves on hand balancing stands performed in a controlled manner. My favorite parts are at 0:43 and 2:55.

Apart from great strength and coordination, these and similar hand-balancing moves require a great deal of flexibility. If you’d like to increase ranges of motion, decrease pain and become MUCH more flexible, make sure to check out GMB Focused Flexibility.

Learn How to Back Flip in 31 Days
Learn How to Back Flip in 31 Days on Amazon
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One Small Change = One Big Difference

I remember one day in 2005 when I was working out in my garage in San Luis Obispo, California.

I was doing a circuit combining chinnups and handstand pushups (an awesome combo, by the way). I had hit my goal number of reps and sets in the handstand pushups so I thought I was ready to start adding some height to extend the range of motion.

Boy, I was wrong.

You see in order to increase the height, I had to do a new setup which ended up changing my position in the handstand. When I tried I couldn’t do a single rep in this new form when I was suppose to be doing sets of three.

Even after I eliminated the new height and replicated the same position I still found these handstand pushups dramatically harder then the version I had been doing before.

What was going on here?

That was my first realization that by changing your position in the handstand and for the pushups you can dramatically increase or decrease the difficulty of the move. And this is without adding any height or weight!

It’s funny when people say they can do 15 or 20 handstand pushups. That’s all great but HOW are you doing those reps?

I can tell you how to make handstand pushups as easy as possible or so hard it’ll cut your reps by at least half, again without doing anything but changing the position of your hands, arms, head and body.

Trampoline Handbook
Trampoline Handbook on Amazon

And on that note I have a very special announcement coming tomorrow.

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

P.S. Handstand pushups really are one of the best exercises you can do for many reasons. Why not go deep and learn all you can about them?

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Will Wall Handstands Help Balance? How Often to Train HSPU's?

I have some cool things in the work for this month. One of them is nearing completion. More on that subject later.

In the meantime let’s tackle a few more questions that have been sent in.

First off from Carol.

“If I keep practicing kicking up to a handstand against the wall, and holding it as long as I can with a tight body, will I eventually be able to do the handstand without the wall?”

The handstand against the wall is an important lead-up stunt I advise beginners to do when starting out with the handstand. It is great to work up to holding for at least one minute while maintaining a good position.

However, although you can learn how to keep your body tight and up in space you will not learn how to balance from this position. This requires a few other moves as well as practicing at the freestanding handstand itself.

And next from Ashley.

“Hi there. I consider myself to be a quite a physical culturist. I have made handstands a staple exercise in my upperbody workouts. I am currently working towards handstand push ups with my hands elevated to get full range of motion. How often would you recommend to train handstands to get to the desired standard?”

First off congratulations. Handstand pushups are often no more then a dream to most people, especially when you start going after the full range of motion.

I just happened to be working on a few myself today. In all honesty, depending on how you train with them you could do them everyday or just twice a week. And either way you can make progress.

If you just do a few sets each day and none of them are an all-out effort, you could do them every day.

But in most cases I would advise two or three times a week. Train them hard and eventually you’ll be able to do many full range reps. The important thing to look at is if you are moving forward. If your are then your training is good and you should continue.

If you’ve been training handstand pushups whether just starting out or doing them with ease I’d love to hear about your training. Send in questions, concerns, workouts or specific exercises you’ve come up with. Just hit the reply button up above.

Trampoline Handbook
Trampoline Handbook on Amazon

That’ll wrap it up for today.

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

P.S. About that first thing I mentioned. If you’re following me on facebook or twitter there was a big hint just put up there in the form of a question. If you aren’t already become my friend on facebook or follow me on twitter by clicking the links.

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Parkour Terrain and How Much to Practice Handstands

Thought I answer a couple more questions today. Lots of them have been coming in recently. While I can’t get to every one individually I’ll try to answer them in these posts.

“I always wanted to start parkour and didn’t know how to start. When I saw the dvd that your selling I thought this is an excellent starting point, but the problem is that there is no vaults, rails etc… in the place that I live in. Any suggestions?”
Ahmed

Unfortunately, Parkour does require a certain kind of terrain in order to really practice the moves. My advice is to just be on the lookout for anything you can use.

While most people practice in cities even small benches and fences can give you a few obstacles to overcome. Most places should have some walls you can climb and areas to jump off of.

The most basic moves can even be practiced with nothing like jumping and rolling.

But in the end you may have to travel a bit to get the best results.

To learn all the Parkour basics get the Parkour Tutorial DVD.

“I have training towards the goal of achieving a full range of motion handstand pushup, I am currently still doing the regular hand stands, which I have not mastered yet. How often would you advise to train handstands.”
Ashley

To keep it short, the more practice you do the better you’ll get.

Handstands are a very tough skill. Getting to the point where you can do them easily and consistently is going to take many hours of practice.

How to do the One Hand Handstand by Professor Orlick
ow to do the One Hand Handstand on Amazon

So to get best results you should practice them every single day. How much you do it is up to you. You can do one long practice or spread it out over the day.

And if you’re just beginning you may have to work up to this volume of training.

Before working on the handstand pushup you should be consistent with your handstands. And because this move can also be taxing on your muscles you may have to practice it a bit less.

I hope that helps. Later this week I’ll have another video or two to show you.

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

P.S. On another topic, I’m doing a free teleseminar on hitting your training goals this Wednesday. Its more focused on strength training but will cover practicing skills as well. If you want to sign up for the Goal Teleseminar click here.

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Free Movement and Complete Control

Free to move and in control.

Isn’t that what hand balancing and all acrobatics is all about? Being able to move your body in any which way and having complete control.

Capable of hopping onto your hands and shifting one way or another, posting on a single hand then coming down to your feet only when you want to.

What separates the amateur from the pro is having charge of all movement and making it look easy.

I’m always on the lookout for anything that can help give me an edge and also to make life more enjoyable.

One piece of training that too many people neglect is mobility. The issue isn’t flexibility. The issue is being able to move each joint individually through a range of motion that it is SUPPOSE to be able to go through without hurting or stiffness.

This is the key to longevity. To living without aches and pains. And at the same time it will make you a better athlete more capable to handle your challenges.

Many people are familiar with some level of this training whether it was done for a warm-up back in school for physical education or some sports. Simple things like arm or ankle circles. Turning the head from side to side and the like.

But those most basic moves, if they’re done at all are not the complete picture. Too many joints are neglected. The mid-back, pelvis and individual fingers are just a few examples.

And like anything else mobility practice should be progressive. You gain better control by adding complexity to the movement.

Learn How to Back Flip in 31 Days
Learn How to Back Flip in 31 Days on Amazon

To learn more about gaining control of your body and movement check this out.

If you have issues with your hands, shoulders or back this could be the one thing that helps you take back your body.

The newly-released book Free to Flow will guide you through the starting movements up to complex waves, diagonal infinities and clovers for each part of the body.

And it’ll give you much else. You can get this 390-page book right now for only $34.95.

Consider it an investment in your health and as a way to improve your performance whether in sports, martial arts, hand balancing, or just about anything else.

Click here to find out more about Free to Flow

Sincerely,
Logan Christopher

P.S. I don’t often make recommendations of other people’s products but when I do you know its good. Considering what this book can do for you I think it’s a steal at the current price. Click to read more about it including Sonnon’s amazing story.

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Hand Balancing Stands?

Thanks to Harley who came up with names of the athletes of those pictured in the ringless Victorian. Tibbett and Armand Bouley.

Always good to give credit were it’s due.

Now another question I’ve received a number of times over the months. And then you can answer a question of mine.

Where do you get hand balancing stands like the professionals use?

I haven’t seen much on this. Though one time I found a professional stand on an Australian website running for $5995. A bit ridiculous if you ask me. And that didn’t include shipping!

Learn How to Back Flip in 31 Days
Learn How to Back Flip in 31 Days on Amazon

Now most people aren’t even looking for that kind of setup unless they are professionals.

Still, I’ve been talking to a couple of people who know how to build things about coming up with something usable and inexpensive.

But before I pursue this any further I’d like to know if it’s really worth the effort.

And in case you’re wondering why people use these stands. It’s actually easier to balance on stands once you get use to them. They allow a little more action and you can grip better. Plus they just have a certain feel to them. In addition they give you an added range of motion for certain feats.

So are you interested in a pair of portable hand balancing stands?

Just post a comment below. Or send an email to [email protected] A simple yes or no would do, but if there’s something in particular you’re looking for let me know.

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

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