Tag Archives | Stunts

Strength, Disrespect and Fear

Going to answer a few more questions today.

“I can do a handstand for about 15 seconds now and I can also walk on my hands a bit thanks to this website but when I try to press into a handstand my arms die on me. is they any good exercises that will help me build up to a handstand press. btw this site rules lol”
Mellon

First off your welcome for the help. It really doesn’t take much strength to balance on the hands, but pressing up into a handstand is another matter. And of course, the amount of strength you need depends on the type of press you’re doing.

There are several ways to build up your strength. Really any manner of pressing. Any exercise that strengthens your arms and shoulders can be beneficial.

It’s a good idea to make sure you are strong enough before really working on the skills of doing handstand presses. If your max is somewhere around your weight you aren’t going to get much practice as you’ll be too fatigued.

“Well, I’ve been following your videos for a little while, particularly the handstand videos.  The video to learn to do a handstand was what got me started and I’ve been doing them since. “Unfortunately, I don’t understand why, but I get a lot of disrespect when I do them in public places (I.E. School (High School Senior)), but I’m still sticking to them proudly. Handstands for life, thanks for ultimately opening me up to the art of them!”
Greggory

Yeah, kids can be cruel. But don’t worry about what others think. After all is said and done, they’ll likely be jealous of the skills you’ve gained from your practice.

“How can you do a handstand if your scared.”
Quade

Get over the fear. How do you get over the fear? it’s a matter of working at it step-by-step doing easier skills until you feel comfortable with the handstand.

That’s why I created the Secrets of the Handstand Quickstart Guide. To give you the lead-up stunts that will build your abilities so that you can handle the handstand.

I didn’t think of it before but these same skills are going to get you comfortable being upside down and ease your way up to the handstand.

Often times its just a matter of doing it. I was at the beach the other day and decided to do some backflips which I hadn’t done in over a month. That period of time had made me a little rusty and brought back a bit of fear in me.

What did I do? I warmed up with a few back handsprings and other drills then moved on to the back flips. No problem after that.

Learn How to Back Flip in 31 Days
Learn How to Back Flip in 31 Days on Amazon

And if you want to find out more about these and other tumbling drills get your copy of Tumbling Illustrated.

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

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Handstand Stunts from the Olympics

Have you been watching as much of the Olympics as I have?

Honestly it’s a bit tiring staying up until the early morning hours since they take place halfway around the world from where I am. But what can I say, they only come around every four years.

And its always a pleasure of mine to watch the best in the world do what they do.

There’s been exciting matches, close calls and comebacks all around. Plus new world records are broken everyday. (Did you see Jamaica’s Usain Bolt on the 100m dash?)

Great events in gymnastics and they aren’t done yet. One problem I have with professional gymnastics is the judging because it’s not perfect. Since it’s done by humans it doesn’t always seem fair. But that’s how it is.

It shouldn’t take away from the pleasure of watching the athletes.

One exercise I’ve been seeing a lot of in the Men’s Floor Routines is a straight arm straddle press from a crucifix position. Also known as a Maltese Press to a Wide Arm Handstand or a Swallow Press to a Japanese Handstand.

Considering this is a D skill it may be out of your range but that doesn’t mean you can’t try the wide handstand itself.

Place your hands wide on the ground, with the hands out and the thumbs pointing forward. Kick-up into position and attempt to hold.

Alternatively you can jump from a normal handstand into the wide handstand. With a little push on the hands slide them outward in position.

Walking and Jumping On Your HandsWalking and Jumping On Your Hands on Amazon

Just another variation you can have fun with. And thanks to the Olympics for reminding me of it.

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

P.S. You need to master the regular handstand before you attempt any variations. Get step-by-step handstand instructions here.

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Watching the Amazing Chinese Acrobats

I was down at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk yesterday. Not to go on any rides but to watch the new show they’ve been having. The Amazing Chinese Acrobats.

I’ll never turn down an opportunity to watch talented individuals to their thing.

Before it all began the announcer was saying that many of these acrobats had trained since they were four years old. That it took athletic strength, impeccable balance, and flawless timing to do these stunts.

I fully agree with those statements. I’m going to try to head back to take some pictures and write up a few articles like I did for the Moscow Circus last year if I get the permission.

Just to give you an idea of what took place: a contortionist balancing glasses, a woman juggling a table with her feet, seven people on a single bicycle, pole climbing, hand balancing on the stacked chairs, and more.

Many of the classic Chinese acrobatic feats. Of course there were some new spins and I was impressed by their showmanship.

There were some kids nearby who exclamations made it seem like every move was an impossibility.

Don’t get me wrong, it was some amazing stuff. I couldn’t do a bunch of it and I was clapping right along with everyone else.

Tumbling Illustrated
Tumbling Illustrated on Amazon

But here I was thinking I can do that one. I could get that with a little practice. To me nothing was impossible or magical. Just dedication and practice.

I don’t mean to come off as saying I’m on the level of these athletes. My point is that anyone can work up to some level of skill in feats similar to these.

And you don’t have to start at four years old, be five feet tall, or weigh less than 120 lbs.

If I can learn how to do a back flip just about anyone can.

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

P.S. If you’re in the area, check out the show which is running through August 21st. If you’re not you can see of the best Chinese Acrobatics in the world.

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David Webster on Hand Balancing

Strength historian David Webster wrote this about hand balancing in 1963:

“Few physical culturists attracted to balancing have any ambitions to perfect a first class act and top the bill at the variety theatres or on television, this has happened time and time again to fellows who set out to learn a handstand just for the fun of it.

Few forms of training are as enjoyable as balancing and not only the participators find it so; those watching the activity derive a great deal of pleasure from seeing the thrills and spills of training sessions as well as enjoying the final polished performance of the feats.

With a little conscientious practice, most people can master the elementary balances and this in itself encourages them to try harder stunts. Those who have a background in strength athletics of any description will have a great advantage over the less experienced.

The strong men will find their strength in the arms and shoulders a great asset, but don’t worry if you don’t possess strength or experience because the first balances can be practiced even by schoolboys.

Master the basic balances before trying the harder stunts. These lay the foundation for future success.”

I would agree with David completely.

I decided to master the handstand one day and look where that has led me. I’m not one of the best by any means but I’m teaching hundreds across the world.

Just look where you can be in 10 or 20 years. That’s a lot of time to practice!

It starts with the foundation. One simple move, the handstand.

From there you can take it in so many directions.

Finger Balancing

Walking and Jumping on Your Hands

The One Hand Handstand

Walking and Jumping On Your HandsWalking and Jumping On Your Hands on Amazon

Contorting Body Position

And much more. Once you learn the basics the next step is up to you. As long as you keep pushing forward, in a little time, you’ll be doing moves that will impress others and get them started on the hand balancing path.

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

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The 7 Values of Tumbling by Loken and Willoughby

The past couple days have been crazy. I was amazed at the response to the Tumbling Course. Within a few minutes of putting the page up orders were coming in.

The good news is if you’ve bought your copy of the Tumbling Course before today, it is in the mail and on its way.

For those of you who’ve ordered, could you do me a favor and send me a email when it does arrive, with your initial impressions? Thanks!

There are quite a few left so if you’ve been waiting now’s the time to act. When I was looking over the course I couldn’t help but to think what a good deal it is.

In order to actually show you I’ve added a picture of all that you’ll get to the Tumbling Course page, but you can see it right here.

Tumbling Course

And that doesn’t even include the bonus tele-seminar. Right now, you have 5 days left to get it at $49.

Those that have ordered will understand the following. Here is a list of the benefits of tumbling, an excerpt from Loken and Willoughby’s ‘Complete Book of Gymnastics’.

The specific values of tumbling activities are:

1. Tumbling develops coordination and timing.

2. Tumbling develops agility and flexibility because of the nature of the movements involved in the activity, Much bending, tucking, and twisting is required to perform the stunts well.

3. Because of the running and springing necessary in tumbling activities, strength is developed in the legs. This is somewhat unique in that most other gymnastic activities tend to neglect the legs.

4.Courage and determination are developed in some of the more daring and difficult tumbling stunts. More advanced stunts involve movements performed with the body completely in the air.

How to do the One Hand Handstand by Professor Orlick
ow to do the One Hand Handstand on Amazon

5. Learning to control the body in basic tumbling skills has great carryover to the other sports.

6. The art of falling correctly, as learned in tumbling, is of great importance in many sports as well as normal daily activities. A relaxed rolling fall very often prevents or reduces injury and enable a person to regain his feet quickly after a fall.

7. Because tumbling is a natural activity, it is self-motivating and provides a great deal of fun and enjoyment for its participants.

Very well said, and succinctly too. As complete as list as there could be. If you want to get started quickly you know where to go, https://lostartofhandbalancing.com/tumbling.html

Good Luck and Good Tumbling,
Logan Christopher

P.S. I’ll be sharing with you some old hand balancing pictures this weekend that you haven’t seen before.

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How to do the Headspring

First off a big thanks to everyone who took the time to fill out the survey. Your questions and comments are extremely helpful.

The Acrobatic Conditioning report is shaping up nicely. I expect it’ll be done later this week.

In the mean time one question that came up more than once went something along these lines. I can do forward rolls no problem, but how to you do a front handspring?

I may be risking starting to sound like a broken record but the answer is to work on a few stunts that’ll lead-up to it. In this case work on the HEADspring first.

And the video will show you how.

Walking and Jumping On Your HandsWalking and Jumping On Your Hands on Amazon

As you progress forward in tumbling you will realize that almost all the moves are a variation of some basic movement. In this case that is a spring generated from the back through the legs.

This is the foundational movement of too many stunts to name but here are a few, front handspring, kips, headsprings, snap-downs, roundoffs, etc.

If you can do a good headspring the handspring is not far off. Just lock out your arms and do the same movement.

Good Luck and Good Tumbling,
Logan Christopher

 

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Frog Stand

The frog stand makes it easier to learn the handstand by training your hand balancing skills in an easier manner.

[youtube:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vp86vFUlV84]

They call it hand balancing for a reason after all. The frogstand lowers your center of gravity and makes this learning the skills of manipulating your balance with your hands easier.

If you can’t hold the frog stand for at least a minute you have no reason to go after a free standing handstand. That’s my stance and I’m sticking to it.

But it’s not the only move. In fact there’s four. Master these and the handstand becomes much easier to learn.

You want to know what the four are?

Okay, it’s the frogstand, headstand, forearm stand, and handstand against the wall. But make sure you do them right.

The Secrets of the Handstand Quick Start DVD covers all four lead-up stunts and much more.

Ultimate Guide to Handstand Pushups
Ultimate Guide to Handstand Pushups on Amazon

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

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Leading up to any Handstand Stunt

Seemed to have raised some interest with my last email. So I’ve decided to go into a little more depth on the subject.

To sum up what I said last time: The best way to learn the handstand, one hand handstand, or any stunt is not to do the move itself, in the beginning, but work on lead-up stunts.

Obviously at a certain point you will need to work on the skill itself in order to master it but you shouldn’t start there.

If you look at a weightlifting move like the deadlift, let’s say you have a goal to lift 500 lbs. You wouldn’t start out trying to lift this weight because most likely you could not even budge it. No, you start with what you can do and move up in weight from there.

If your goal is to do a move like the one hand handstand you can’t just start with a lighter weight. Most bodyweight exercises don’t work this way. Just going for the move is like trying to deadlift 500 lbs. when your max is 300. Not gonna happen.

An easier version of the move is essentially the same thing as a lighter weight. When you are good with one move you move on to a harder variation, just like adding weight.

Failing to do this is why so many people never reach their goal. They just try the move over and over seeing little or no progress.

One move for the one hand handstand is to place your other arm on a raised box or chair and use it to help balance.

For the normal handstand you have moves like the headstand and frogstand. But there are many more for these moves and others.

That’s the genius in how Professor Orlick taught his students. Each move leads in to the next. For the best methods of mastering any hand balancing move check out the Hand Balancing Mastery Course.

If you learn this lesson well, you can apply to many other forms of exercise.By training in this manner you can and will progress much faster. I guarantee it.

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

Hand Balancing Made EasyHandBalancingMadeEasy_on_Amazon

P.S. Right now you can do no better than to get what has been affectionately referred to as the “Hand Balancing Bible“.

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One Handed Handstand

Got another question regarding the one handed handstand.

Hi . i have kinda a problem using one arm handbalancing because i have been practicing on it since long time and i believe i have a good strength in my shoulders yet i cant hold it more than 5 sec but i can hold it for one 1 min if lay against the wall ( same thing goes 2 the left hand ) so my question is what do i have to do to hold it as much as i can ??( is there any particular training should i attempt ? ) (if ya want, i can take a photo of my self while doing it )
Best Regards.

Actually what I am about to tell you applies to the regular handstand as well.

Being able to hold a one arm handstand against a wall is great, especially for a minute long, but this isn’t going to transfer to a free hand balance.

The strength is there, but it doesn’t take much strength to do this move. What it takes is balance and skill.

Using the wall will build your strength and it will help you learn the position if you do it right. What it won’t do is teach you how to balance.

This takes doing the move in the open. The problem is most people try to go straight from a two hand handstand into one by raising the arm. This is not the way and what stops many from mastering this skill.

Balancing in the one hand handstand is very difficult. You will not be able to figure it out by doing the one hand handstand itself, not in the beginning.

Just like I teach with the normal handstand there are a series of different lead-up stunts you should perfect before you move up to the one handstand.

No one covers this better than Prof. Orlick in How to do the One Hand Handstand. He outlines a step-by-step approach to reaching the one hand handstand.If you seriously want to hold a one-hand handstand you have to work up to this balance.

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

P.S. If you want to see a bonehead move and some good old fashioned physical comedy check out this video I came across – https://www.break.com/index/treadmill-handstand-attempt.html. I hope this guy ain’t a student of mine.

Learn How to Back Flip in 31 Days
Learn How to Back Flip in 31 Days on Amazon

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Tiger Bend

I was shooting some video a couple days ago doing a variety of hand balancing stunts. One of them was the Forearm Stand. Prof. Orlick also called it a Tiger Stand. From the stand you can do what is called a Tiger Bend, but we’ll start with the stand first.

This is a great trick in and of itself but its also a good way to work up to a full on handstand. Since you are resting on your entire lower arm and hand you have a bigger base with which to balance.

One you overcome the oddness factor of trying this exercise for the first time you can see the benefits. All the main points of holding a handstand are still there, like keeping tight, but you may have to arch your back a little more for this one.

How to do the One Hand Handstand by Professor Orlick
ow to do the One Hand Handstand on Amazon

Of course the ultimate goal with this exercise is to do what’s known as a Tiger Bend. An advanced exercise for sure. It involves going from the Forearm Stand up into a Handstand. With a little overbalancing and strong triceps you can get there.

Sig Klein doing a Tiger Bend

Since few of us will be able to pull that one off at the present time here are two easier ways. Do the negative movement which is dropping from a Handstand into a Forearm Stand. When you go for this don’t just fall into the position but control it as much as possible.

You can also do Tiger Bend Pushups. Get in a normal pushup position except you are resting on your forearms instead of the hands. Without any rocking motion pushup on to your hands to the top position and lower back down.

You don’t see these moves too often but that doesn’t mean they aren’t great.

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

P.S. For the super advanced hand balancer you can try to duplicate Johnny Weber’s one arm Tiger Bend. Find out how to do it in The True Art and Science of Hand Balancing. The picture above is of Sig Klein from the same book.

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