Tag Archives | Wrist Strength

How To Strengthen Your Wrists

Having enough wrist strength is a crucial part of an injury-free handstand training. Furthermore, not everyone has enough flexibility to keep their hand back 90 degrees for an extended period of time.

In this video by Chris Silcox you can learn several techniques to improve your wrist strength, flexibility and general upper body strength needed for various hand-balancing moves.

Trampoline Handbook
Trampoline Handbook on Amazon

If you’re looking to truly make your entire body indestructible, check out this guide to improve mobility, flexibility and strength.

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4 Tips to Keep Your Wrists Injury-Free

Hand balancing in general puts an awful lot of pressure on wrists and it’s essential to keep them safe and injury-free. To make sure nothing like that happens to you, follow these four rules by Tapp Brothers:

1. Always Warm Up
2. Develop Forearm & Wrist Strength
3. Build Up Flexibility
4. Don’t Over-train

Tumbling Illustrated
Tumbling Illustrated on Amazon

The issue #8 of the Strength Health Mind Power Inner Circle focuses exclusively on making your elbows, wrists and fingers indestructible. If you’d like to buy that single issue, drop me an email at [email protected] for a custom link. It features 13 drills for wrists alone!

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Wrist Strengthening Exercises

An important part of handstands is having hand strength and flexibility so here are some wrist strengthening exercises.

I’ve always had some wrist troubles when it came to handstands due to an old injury. And recently my right wrist has been acting up making even a regular handstand hard to hold.

How have I been able to make progress towards overcoming this?

By doing more handstands!

Because a handstand puts you near or at complete extension of your wrist it’s a position most people never really use or have need for strength in. But for those of us handbalancing that’s different.

Tumbling Illustrated
Tumbling Illustrated on Amazon

Very few other exercises can even get close to this position. So using the handstand itself is the way we want to use to build wrist strength and flexibility.

Of course, if you are just starting out putting your full weight on your hands may be too hard. In this case going from pushups, to elevated pushups and finally to the handstand is the progression to follow. I had to go back to the starting point in order to build up.

It may be uncomfortable. The idea is to push your boundaries a little at a time. Keep doing a bit more each time to expand your wrist flexibility. Of course, you don’t want to push too hard you injure yourself even more. The idea is to make progress slowly and over time.

If its no strain to hold the position, when you are in the handstand (ideally against the wall) you can dig in and press down into the ground doing isometrics to further build your strength, and therefore control when balancing.

Regular practice with these kind of wrist strengthening exercises will result in strong, flexible and healthy hands and wrists.

Good Luck and Good Balancing,
Logan Christopher

P.S. There’s also some nifty stunts by Bob Jones in Chapter 6 of The True Art and Science of Hand Balancing. Be sure to check those out to further build strength and flexibility in those hand balancing hands.

Forearm Development from Various Hand Balancing Skills

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Straightening Handstand, Wrist Strength & More

Diving into a few questions and comments today.

“In the hand stand, and especially in the bridge, the main persisting difficulty is an inherent wrist weakness. In fact I observe steady improvement in back and shoulder flexibility, but the wrist is always setting me back!”
Joseph

I know your pain Joseph, having my own share of wrist problems. But I’ve come a long way in part thanks to handstands.

Here’s a few things you can try out. Always stretch before hand balancing or bridging. Just open the wrist back as far as it will go. And afterwards its great to work it the other direction too.

Try working some of the positions of the fists as well. This is known to help strengthen the wrists.

Of course there is much else to do, including many mobility drills for the hands and fingers. Since this is a problem for many people I’ll be covering it in more detail in the future. But for now I hope that helps.

Onto another comment.

“I got it! Thanks a bunch. I’m pleased with the quality of the material and your service.

“The handstand is really one of the most difficult skill I’m trying to learn, I’m almost there. Been practising since august but I was doing it wrongly by starting to do the handstands and not the build up moves! now I know what I know I’m doing wrong.

“Unfortunately my online friend who is into handbalancing didn’t tell me about the build up moves so I ended up wasting a lot of time practising doing handstands immediately. And most of the resources over the internet failed to teach this important aspect in learning this skill. Out of desperation I even attended a gymnastics class once. After many months of practice (4months) out of 10 attempts 1 will get thru and I would consider that a lucky day if I could hold it for 3seconds! It got so frustrating that I was ready to give up.

“I’m not back to ground zero but I could feel its just a matter of time in learning this. I’ve already mastered the frogstand, headstand and now been practising the kick up. Next would be the forearm stand.

“Here in the philippines, there isn’t much interest in handbalancing. I could only see some B-boys doing a walking handstands but doing static holds? I’ve never seen one. Though when I saw the press to handstand I was blown away by some guy at the gymnastics class.

“Ok got to read the books and dvd! I can’t wait till I can master the handstand! Once I could balance for 30 seconds then on to the advance course.

“Handbalancing is truly a lost art. It’s great that you that you decided to open this resource site.”

Regards,
Gerald

Thanks for sending in the report Gerald. You are too right. Learning the handstand can be frustrating, especially if you take the long slow road of going right to it.

That’s why I created the Secrets of the Handstand Quickstart Guide to give you the lead-up stunts you mentioned and plan to attack the handstand in an easier way.

Once you have that its just a matter of time and practice. You’ll be holding a handstand for 30 seconds in no time.

“How do you correct the arch of the back in a handstand?”
Martha

Let me start off by saying that arching in a handstand is not wrong to do as many people believe. But if you want to straighten out here’s what to do.

Go back to the wall.

Walls are flat so kick up into a handstand and straighten out to the point where all the points on your body are in contact with it.

Of course, you’ll also bring your head down in between your arms and this alone will help to eliminate the arch.

But don’t expect this to go away overnight, and especially be able to balance in the position. You’ll have to work at it to re-configure the body to do as you please since an arched handstand is not only easier but more natural.

That’s it for today. Going to have some new stuff for you this week so stay tuned.

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

Walking and Jumping On Your HandsWalking and Jumping On Your Hands on Amazon

P.S. Frustrated with the difficulty of the handstand? Don’t know the best place to begin? Find the proper path with the Secrets of the Handstand Quickstart Guide

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Handstands and Wrist Strength Part 2 and More

Last time we talked about how you can overcome pain and poor flexibility in your wrists so that you can pursue hand balancing. A subscriber pointed out a few points which are certainly worth mentioning.

There is a way to work around this problem. Handstands can also be done on parallel bars or pushup handles and still be very effective. Rings work too but are even more of a challenge.

Though the body mechanics remain the same, how you go about balancing becomes a different matter.

For most people it will be much harder to balance because your base is smaller. Not the best way to get started on your handstands. But with some work you can balance with ease on any parallettes. And certainly if you are using a wall it is not a problem.

While this is a viable method it will not help the problem itself. You need to build the strength and flexibility and not skirt the issue.

Use this method to get some practice in the handstands if you need it but be sure to work the wrists. After all you can’t go wrong with a strong pair of hands.

Now on to a couple announcements.

The survey is now closed. Thank to all of you for participating. It will take some effort to pour over all the results but I can tell you they will result in some new and exciting changes to the site.

Tumbling Illustrated
Tumbling Illustrated on Amazon

Secondly, I will be holding a contest soon. The details will be in my next email but for now just know that you will have a chance to win a full copy of the Hand Balancing Mastery Course coming soon.  In fact, there may be more than one up for grabs.

The particulars on this new product will be announced in the next weeks as well and you won’t want to miss out. So until then…

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher
 

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Handstands, Wrist Strength and Pain

Another question from a reader. And this isn’t the first time I have seen this problem pop up. Read on and find out what to do about it.

hello Logan,

well i have a question for you,

after a handstand practice i get wrist pain over the back of my wrist and sometimes on the sides the pain shows up while stress the wrist on pushups/ handstand position and sometimes on Ulnar Deviation and Radial Deviation

what can i do about it, maybe there are exercises that can strengthen my wrists and tendon ??

Ultimate Guide to Handstand Pushups
Ultimate Guide to Handstand Pushups on Amazon

thanks 🙂
haggai D.B.

Let me first start of saying I am not a doctor. That may be obvious but I cannot diagnose what the problem is exactly, especially over the internet.

Hand Balancing takes a large degree of hand, wrist, and finger strength and flexibility. Not everyone has the flexibility to keep their hand back 90 degrees which is necessary to do a handstand.

I should say, not everyone starts of with this flexibility. But it can be gained through persistent effort.

Back in High School I suffered an injury to my right wrist. I would get shocked with pain any time I hit someone with my hands and had to get a special cast device made to help me out. Unfortunately it did affect my playing.

When I first started with handstands about a year after, I could not jump right into a handstand. In fact I still usually don’t. I take the time to stretch my wrists through flexion and extension. This primes them for any handstand work.

Even now my right wrist is less flexible than my right, but it has gotten better by leaps and bounds since then.

If holding a handstand causes to much pain then you will need to start at a manageable level and build from there. Pain is a sign you are pushing past your limits.

Do pushups or the pushup position cause you the same pain?

Wherever you need to start, go from there. It may take time but you will build the strength and flexibility to survive all hand balancing without the slightest discomfort.

Good Luck and Good Hand Balancing,
Logan Christopher

P.S. The results of the survey are still pouring in. If you haven’t taken the time yet to fill it out and get your f.ree report, do so now. I can tell you that the site will be changing for the better and soon because of your response.

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