Injury-Proofing Your Ankles

A subscriber wrote in after the release of the Parkour Tutorial DVD with a warning. Thanks again Adam for bringing it to my attention.

Tricking, Parkour, even gymnastics can be rough on the ankles. Sprains, strains, and broken ankles are unfortunately not that uncommon.

In order to avoid this you want to do two things. First off, you want to make sure you can do moves within your capabilities. Don’t start off jumping off of two story buildings.

Secondly, prepare for the worst. Make your body more resilient. The stretches on this video will help prepare your feet and ankles for landings and all the impact.

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Injury-Proofing Your Ankles

And if you take part in running, these same moves will injury-proof you so that no pot-hole is likely to roll your ankle.

Just add a few of these moves to your regular routine and you’ll be better off no matter what you do.

Good Luck and Good Training,
Logan Christopher

P.S. Of course you need to know how to do the moves properly. If you want to get started in Parkour this is the video for you.

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3 Responses to Injury-Proofing Your Ankles

  1. Eli October 26, 2010 at 1:43 pm #

    Hey, i remember watching this when it first came out and it just occurred to me when i was taking my ballet class that a lot of the exercises that your doing seem to be hindering you more so then helping. (correct me if i’m wrong) my ballet teacher told me that you shouldn’t actually stretch your ankle the direction it would usually roll in, because that stretches out the tendons and makes them more flexible making it easier to pass through that position and roll your ankle.

    • Logan October 26, 2010 at 4:20 pm #

      @Eli: Yes and no. With these exercises you aren’t really stretching the tendons and ligaments. You could stretch them to the point of them getting loose and therefore adding to possibility of injuries. But by isometrically adding resistance you can build strength in the end ranges of motion which will help prevent injuries. It’s a big difference. Wish I had mentioned that in the videos.

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    […] fandom is something essential to my being, and the WAY I know is that it has always been there Injury-Proofing Your Ankles – lostartofhandbalancing.com 01/30/2009 Friday 30 January 2009 A subscriber wrote in after the […]

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